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In search of transfer...

What is FBS?

One of the key issues in athletic performance and rehabilitation is the ambiguous nature of transfer; understanding how training carries over to competition. Frans Bosch has been a significant worldwide contributor and authority in this area, and Frans Bosch Systems (FBS) has been set up to bring this knowledge to sports and rehab professionals.

FBS delivers services for coaches, players & therapists that aim to make sense of the many variables at play in optimizing transfer and human movement. Through the study of areas such as dynamic systems theory and the field of motor learning, we can begin to understand movement better than previously thought, and develop a building block approach that helps us navigate through even the most chaotic open skill environments. A solid understanding of this framework developed by Frans Bosch is pivotal when applying these ideas in practice. Movement analysis, deriving the cause of injuries and prescribing exercise for greater efficiency in performance or rehabilitation are just some of the many applications possible.

Frans Bosch

‘Anatomy of Agility’ is set to release in English in early 2020.

Since 1980 Frans worked in athletics, coaching elite sprinters and Olympic high jumpers and for some years as the national coach for jumping events. Since 2005 Frans has been a lecturer at the Fontys University for applied sciences in sports, mainly in the field of anatomy, biomechanics, strength training and motor learning.

Frans has given numerous presentations all over the world on training related topics. Presentations address the complexity of the training process and the need to integrate new fields of science like dynamic systems and new ideas on motor control in existing training theory.

Frans frequently works internationally as a consultant in sport. Clients in recent years are the English Institute of Sports, Wales National Team Rugby, the British & Irish Lions, Japan National Team Rugby, England cricket, West ham United football, Cleveland Brown American Football and others. Together with Ronald Klomp he wrote ‘Running, biomechanics and exercise physiology applied in practice”, published in the Netherlands in 2001 and translated in English in 2005.

‘Strength training and coordination, an integrated approach’ was published in the Netherlands in 2012 and in English in 2016.

3

Groundbreaking

Publications

Running (with Ronald Klomp)
Strength training & coordination
Anatomy of agility

John Pryor

John, better known as JP in sporting circles, has operated at the international level in sport for 20 years. Previously the strength and conditioning coordinator for the Japan Rugby Union (2012-2015), JP has earned international acclaim through the use of innovative training methodologies derived from a deep devotion to biomechanical, physiological and motor learning research.

Not one to rest on research alone, JP has always tried to put any ideas into practise himself, and with his small group of “experimental athletes”. The methods that work then move forward to his serious teams.

A graduate of Southern Cross University with a Master of Health Science in biomechanics, JP has excelled at the highest levels of international rugby and has played a key role in the success of Japan’s National Team.

In no other circumstance was the importance of training specificity more readily apparent than in World Cup competition when Japan upset the Springboks of South Africa, as players, coaches and observers all credited the fitness of Japan’s National Team as central to its success. Japan’s victory is widely regarded as the greatest upset in the history of rugby, with JP developing a unique and highly specialized approach to rugby training in advance of the competition.

Before taking on his responsibilities with the Japan Rugby Union, JP also worked as a strength and conditioning coach with the Australian Rugby Union. He has been full time at the Brumbies, the Waratahs and the Wallabies as a strength and speed specialist.

In Japan, JP was also the Head of Athletic performance for Suntory Sungoliath with coach Eddie Jones. This period included multiple Japan and Top League championships and an unprecedented period of success.

Most recently, JP has joined Fiji Rugby as the Head of Strength and Conditioning, preparing the team for the 2019 Rugby World Cup. JP is a faculty member at GAIN, and is an accomplished and engaging international presenter.

20

Years

International & professional experience

Multiple sporting codes

Who have we worked with?

Frans Bosch Systems have been deployed at a number of professional sporting clubs, across a wide array of sporting codes around the world.
See some of our many clientele below:

Papers

Bas Van Hooren & Frans Bosch
Journal of Sports Sciences Volume 35, 2017 - Issue 23

Is there really an eccentric action of the hamstrings during the swing phase of high-speed running? part I: A critical review of the literature

It is widely assumed that there is an eccentric hamstring muscle fibre action during the swing phase of high-speed running. However, animal and modelling studies in humans show that the increasing distance between musculotendinous attachment points during forward swing is primarily due to passive lengthening associated with the take-up of muscle slack. Later in the swing phase, the contractile element (CE) maintains a near isometric action while the series elastic (tendinous) element first stretches as the knee extends, and then recoils causing the swing leg to forcefully retract prior to ground contact. Although modelling studies showed some active lengthening of the contractile (muscular) element during the mid-swing phase of high-speed running, we argue that the increasing distance between the attachment points should not be interpreted as an eccentric action of the CE due to the effects of muscle slack. Therefore, there may actually be no significant eccentric, but rather predominantly an isometric action of the hamstrings CE during the swing phase of high-speed running when the attachment points of the hamstrings are moving apart. Based on this, we propose that isometric rather than eccentric exercises are a more specific way of conditioning the hamstrings for high-speed running.

 

Bas Van Hooren & Frans Bosch
Journal of Sports Sciences Volume 35, 2017 - Issue 23

Is there really an eccentric action of the hamstrings during the swing phase of high-speed running? Part II: Implications for exercise

We have previously argued that there may actually be no significant eccentric, but rather predominantly an isometric action of the hamstring muscle fibres during the swing phase of high-speed running when the attachment points of the hamstrings are moving apart. Based on this we suggested that isometric rather than eccentric exercises are a more specific way of conditioning the hamstrings for high-speed running. In this review we argue that some of the presumed beneficial adaptations following eccentric training may actually not be related to the eccentric muscle fibre action, but to other factors such as exercise intensity. Furthermore, we discuss several disadvantages associated with commonly used eccentric hamstring exercises. Subsequently, we argue that high-intensity isometric exercises in which the series elastic element stretches and recoils may be equally or even more effective at conditioning the hamstrings for high-speed running, since they also avoid some of the negative side effects associated with eccentric training. We provide several criteria that exercises should fulfil to effectively condition the hamstrings for high-speed running. Adherence to these criteria will guarantee specificity with regards to hamstrings functioning during running. Practical examples of isometric exercises that likely meet several criteria are provided.

 

Bas Van Hooren & Frans Bosch
Journal of Sports Sciences Volume 35, 2017 - Issue 23

Preventing hamstring injuries – Part 2: There is possibly an isometric action of the hamstrings in high-speed running and it does matter

We thank Shield and Murphy (1) for promoting discussion on our articles (2 3), hereby providing us an opportunity to clarify and elaborate on our arguments and hopefully forward the field of hamstring injury prevention.  Most prominently, Shield and Murphy state that recommendations to employ an isometric hamstring training approach instead of an eccentric one is premature and they state that we presented no evidence from human studies showing that hamstring fascicles behave isometrically in running.  Here we will respond to both points as well as several other points.

 

Bas Van Hooren & Frans Bosch
Strength and conditioning journal 38(5):75-87 October

Influence of Muscle Slack on High-Intensity Sport Performance: A Review

Rapid force development is of paramount importance for most sports. An often overlooked performance limiting factor is muscle slack, which is represented by the delay between muscular contraction and recoil of the series elastic elements. We will review acute and long-term effects of applying cocontractions, countermovements (CMs), and external load on muscle slack. Cocontractions may be an effective solution to reduce the degree of muscle slack. Moreover, CMs and external load may negatively inflluence the capability to develop cocontractions and hence may be detrimental to high-intensity sport performance that is usually performed with little or no external load.

 

Bas Van Hooren & Frans Bosch
Strength and conditioning journal 38(5):75-87 October

Can resistance training enhance the rapid force development in unloaded dynamic isoinertial multi-joint movements? A systematic review

Can resistance training enhance the rapid force development in unloaded dynamic isoinertial multi-joint movements? A systematic review. J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2324–2337, 2017—The objectives of this systematic review were to (a) evaluate whether resistance training can improve the rapid force development in unloaded dynamic isoinertial multi-joint movements and (b) investigate whether these effects differ between untrained/recreationally trained and well-trained individuals. Four electronic databases were screened for studies that measured the effects of resistance training on rapid force development in unloaded dynamic isoinertial multi-joint movements. Twelve studies with a total of 271 participants were included. 10/26 (38%) and 6/14 (43%) of the measures of rapid force development in unloaded dynamic isoinertial multi-joint movements significantly improved following training in the untrained/recreationally trained and well-trained individuals, respectively. Additionally, 7/14 (50%) and 3/12 (25%) of the measures significantly improved during a countermovement and squat jump in the untrained/recreationally trained individuals and 4/6 (67%) and 2/8 (25%) significantly improved during a countermovement and squat jump in the well-trained individuals, respectively. These findings indicate that resistance training has a limited transfer to rapid force development in unloaded dynamic isoinertial multi-joint movements, especially for well-trained individuals and in movements without a countermovement. Furthermore, rapid force development has likely a limited transfer from movements with countermovement to movements without a countermovement and from bilateral movements to unilateral movements. Therefore, it is important to specifically mimic the actual sport movement in order to maximize the transfer of training and testing.